Car Rental Portugal

  • 00:00
  • 00:30
  • 01:00
  • 01:30
  • 02:00
  • 02:30
  • 03:00
  • 03:30
  • 04:00
  • 04:30
  • 05:00
  • 05:30
  • 06:00
  • 06:30
  • 07:00
  • 07:30
  • 08:00
  • 08:30
  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30
  • 18:00
  • 18:30
  • 19:00
  • 19:30
  • 20:00
  • 20:30
  • 21:00
  • 21:30
  • 22:00
  • 22:30
  • 23:00
  • 23:30
  • 00:00
  • 00:30
  • 01:00
  • 01:30
  • 02:00
  • 02:30
  • 03:00
  • 03:30
  • 04:00
  • 04:30
  • 05:00
  • 05:30
  • 06:00
  • 06:30
  • 07:00
  • 07:30
  • 08:00
  • 08:30
  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30
  • 18:00
  • 18:30
  • 19:00
  • 19:30
  • 20:00
  • 20:30
  • 21:00
  • 21:30
  • 22:00
  • 22:30
  • 23:00
  • 23:30
I have promotional code

Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment fees**
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz in Portugal

Tucked away on Europe’s west coast, the long, thin Iberian nation of Portugal packs plenty of variety within its borders. From fascinating cities full of grand old squares to the beaches and resorts of the Algarve, it’s remarkable for its diversity and the warm welcome extended to visitors.

Whether you’re here to see Porto and Lisbon – truly two of the world’s great cities – or to take in some golf in the sunshine, we’ve got branches exactly where you need them across the country – including on the island of Madeira, if you’re heading to Funchal or Monte.

Pay in advance or on collection and we’ll soon have you out on the road in your choice of car. Don’t forget our best price guarantee and 24-hour helpline – we’re always on hand to help you.

Driving in and around Portugal

The city of Porto, Portugal sitting alongside the Douro River

Portugal is a delight to drive around. The road system is extensive and relatively modern, while the diversity of the different regions means that a road trip here is truly rewarding. Wherever you go you’ll find pretty villages, friendly towns with bustling squares and – usually – sunny skies.

Your visit will run even smoother if you brush up on a few local driving laws before you go, notably that children under 12 cannot sit in the front passenger seat and that you must carry photographic proof of identity in your car at all times.

Speed limits vary by type of road and region, with a maximum speed of 75mph on freeways, and a minimum of 30mph. In built-up areas, the limit is 30mph although some small town centers will have limits as low as 10mph.

There are numerous toll roads in Portugal. Some of these have booths where you can pay, but others will require pre-payment. Speak to our local team on arrival for more information on how to organize payment for these.

Many towns have residential parking zones, so it’s often best to use parking garages or lots. Where you see ‘Estacionamento Proibido’ signs, along with yellow or red lines, you can’t park in that zone.

The E1 is one of the main routes in Portugal, entering the north of the country from Spain and heading through Braga, Porto, Coimbra, Leiria and Lisbon. It then proceeds to the popular Algarve town of Albufeira and swings east to the south of Spain.

One of the most memorable drives in Portugal is route N222 in the Douro Valley. It even has the honor of being voted the world’s best driving route.

The stretch from Pinhao to Peso da Regua passes through the heart of wine country, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and there are more than 90 bends to negotiate as you weave your way through the beautiful terraced hillsides.

 

A quick guide to Portugal

Rossio Square in Lisbon, Portugal filled with people as the sun starts to set

The rolling hills and lush forests of the north, the cobbled streets of the cities, the sun-kissed south – there’s a world to explore within Portugal. The Portuguese are keen on tradition and you’ll find their cafés and cuisine maintaining culinary customs that have been passed down through the centuries. 

A valley of vitality

The Douro Valley, in the north of the country, is lush and fertile. It’s home to the port grape and the magnificent city of Porto that gives it its name. It’s a city that seems to rise steeply from the river, with the famous 19th century Dom Luis I bridge separating the main town from Vila Nova de Gaia.

It’s a city built for strolling, where you’ll see humble churches covered in traditional azulejo tiles, and charming public places such as Batalha Square. While away some time here over a coffee and the delicious custard tarts called pastel de nata. If you see one landmark, make it the Igreja de Sao Francisco – the Gothic exterior hides an incredibly lavish baroque interior.

Sultry Sintra

Another UNESCO World Heritage site, the town of Sintra, west of Lisbon, has long been a place for royalty and the rich to escape the searing summer heat of the cities. Much of the architecture here derives from Romanticism and, combined with the lush green forests, makes for a place of charm, enchantment and whimsy.

It’s encapsulated in the Palacio Nacional da Pena, a riot of lemon, blue, red and Moorish elements that rises above the town.

Lisbon’s lanes

Close by is the capital itself, with its reputed seven hills. One of Europe’s most lively and interesting cities, it’s a place of warren-like streets, especially if you take the funicular up to the Bairro Alto district, an area that comes into its own at night.

Join the natives at the Mercado da Ribeira, a bustling and colorful market that also houses a new food court where dozens of outlets utilize the freshest possible produce. It’s the place to try the very best of Portuguese food, both traditional and modern.

Fall for Faro 

Sun-seekers often head to the Algarve’s endless beaches, great golf courses and abundance of grilled sardines without lingering in Faro. It’s a shame – it’s a fine city that has retained its old grandeur in the face of mass tourism.

Wander the medieval areas and explore Faro Cathedral, largely built in the 13th and 14th centuries. The tower here affords a bird’s-eye view of the city. The 18th century Igreja do Carmo is a Rococo church worth seeing, especially for the Chapel of Bones (Capela dos Ossos) at its rear. Finish your visit with a meal at the harbor – fresh fish from the day’s catch served as the sun goes down. Our pick-up at Faro offers the perfect gateway to the whole to the Algarve.

Car rental in Portugal is the perfect way to explore the cities, towns and beaches of this endlessly endearing country.

** When the booking is cancelled within seven days of being made.