Car Rental Italy

  • 00:00
  • 00:30
  • 01:00
  • 01:30
  • 02:00
  • 02:30
  • 03:00
  • 03:30
  • 04:00
  • 04:30
  • 05:00
  • 05:30
  • 06:00
  • 06:30
  • 07:00
  • 07:30
  • 08:00
  • 08:30
  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30
  • 18:00
  • 18:30
  • 19:00
  • 19:30
  • 20:00
  • 20:30
  • 21:00
  • 21:30
  • 22:00
  • 22:30
  • 23:00
  • 23:30
  • 00:00
  • 00:30
  • 01:00
  • 01:30
  • 02:00
  • 02:30
  • 03:00
  • 03:30
  • 04:00
  • 04:30
  • 05:00
  • 05:30
  • 06:00
  • 06:30
  • 07:00
  • 07:30
  • 08:00
  • 08:30
  • 09:00
  • 09:30
  • 10:00
  • 10:30
  • 11:00
  • 11:30
  • 12:00
  • 12:30
  • 13:00
  • 13:30
  • 14:00
  • 14:30
  • 15:00
  • 15:30
  • 16:00
  • 16:30
  • 17:00
  • 17:30
  • 18:00
  • 18:30
  • 19:00
  • 19:30
  • 20:00
  • 20:30
  • 21:00
  • 21:30
  • 22:00
  • 22:30
  • 23:00
  • 23:30
I have promotional code

Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen the booking is cancelled within two days of being made.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz in Italy

As a country of romance, architecture, art, food and history, Italy is a delightful place to visit. One of its many joys is its regional diversity; each has its own flavor, local heroes, legacy, and style of food.

This means that while you’re sure to fall in love with Italy on your first visit, there’ll be plenty more to explore when you come back.

Hertz has pick-up locations all over the country and in all the major cities. We’re covered from Rome to Milan, Florence to Naples, Bologna to Brindisi and from Venice to the Amalfi coast. If you’re looking for an urban or rural break, countryside or coast – everything is within easy reach with car rental in Italy.

Choose the perfect car for your visit with our straightforward booking process. We’ve got large vehicles made for family adventures, and more compact options for business trips. If you pre-pay, you can arrive and be exploring Italy in a matter of minutes.

Driving in and around Italy

Driving in and around Italy

Italians love their cars – after all, they’re the nation that gave us Ferrari and Lamborghini. And it’s a country that’s deeply rewarding to explore by road, whether you’re navigating the rocky coast next to the ocean, or plunging through countryside past fragrant lemon or orange trees, olive groves and vineyards.

Speed limits are clearly signposted and are 50kph (around 30mph) in built-up areas, 90kph on standard roads outside of these, 110kph on divided highways and 130kph (around 80mph) on freeways. These limits drop in wet weather. Freeways (known as ‘autostrade’ in Italy) are toll roads and you’ll need to take a ticket on entry and pay in cash on leaving.

Seat belts must be worn where fitted, but you can find a comprehensive guide to driving rules in Italy online. If you’re planning on heading into some of the ski resorts and mountain towns, you may need snow tires and chains – our staff can advise you about that and the ideal car for those conditions.

The Autostrada A1 is the main freeway in Italy running north-south. It’s known as the ‘Highway of the Sun’ and measures 470 miles from Milan to Naples via Florence and Rome.

If you’re driving to the south of Italy, you can join the A2 from Fisciano to San Giovanni. In the north of the country, at its widest point, the A4 – known as the Serenissima – connects Trieste and Turin, calling at Venice and Milan along the way.

One of the great driving experiences is the A5 in the north-west. It links Turin to France through a tunnel beneath Mont Blanc. Be aware, however, that the toll fee is costly.

A quick guide to Italy

A quick guide to Italy

There are many ways to explore Italy. Head out on a gastronomic tour, going region by region to see and taste the different ways they prepare and serve meat, pasta and pizza dough.

Tour the great lakes, stopping at Maggiore, Garda and Como to enjoy the tranquility. Explore the history and legacy of the Roman Empire, and the great Renaissance artists. The joy of Italy is that you can combine them all.

Roaming the Renaissance

Many art lovers gravitate towards Rome, Milan and Florence to get their fix of the old masters. You’ll certainly see some of the big tickets in Florence, with masterpieces by Michelangelo, Fra Angelico, Raphael, Donatello, Botticelli and more.

Go further afield and you’ll find other cities just as packed with creativity. Renaissance painter Caravaggio lived in Naples for four years and has left three of his deep, brooding works behind. Today, Naples is a city that loves its art – it’s currently renovating many of its underground metro stations with art installations.

Elsewhere in Campania, you can drive out to Amalfi, Sorrento and Positano, visit the preserved volcanic ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum, climb Vesuvius, and even take a jet ski out to the island of Capri, one of the world’s most picturesque and romantic locations.

The Italian larder

There’s much more to Italian food than pizza and pasta – although they’re comfortably the world’s best at making them. Each region has its own methods – and what’s added or not added to the sauce in one city is considered sacrilegious in another.

Pizza in Rome, for example, has a much thinner crust than in Naples (deep pan is pretty much a no-go across the whole country) while the iconic pasta dish of Bologna, spaghetti bolognese, bears little resemblance to the versions peddled throughout the world.

Food is a matter of civic pride here. You can go off-piste at a range of experimental and high-end restaurants, but there’s much to be said for eating your way around the classics – risotto, lasagne, ossobuco alla Milanese, ribollita and, if they’re in season, truffles.

For dessert, gelato is a completely different experience to all the ice cream you’ve ever tasted – much more intense and rich in flavor.

Bargains and beaches

Milan is one of the fashion capitals of the world, home to several classic design houses. A great city to shop in, you can time your visit for the ‘Saldi’, or sales, in July and pick up a designer bargain.

If the weather’s too hot for city life, Italy is blessed with an abundance of perfect beaches. Whether you want the hustle and bustle of a busy shoreline, or a secluded place to get away from the crowds, you’ll find them all.

Cala Goloritze in Sardinia is so pretty it was given protected status, with limestone cliffs towering over white sand. Head for the island of Sicily and the pleasant, cobbled town of Cefalu. The curve of sand here is popular, but not overcrowded, and the town is a short, sandy walk away for a refreshing afternoon drink or gelato.

The many beaches of Elba can get busy, but there are some that are worth striking out for – Forno and Sant’Andrea among them.

Car rental in Italy will open up this vista of discovery for you – the sporting passion, the incredible food, the dramatic coast, and the thriving cities – and you’ll be sure to make some wonderful memories in ‘bella Italia’.