Car Rental Dublin

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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen the booking is cancelled within two days of being made.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz Car Rental in Dublin

Wandering aimlessly around Dublin is one of life’s greatest pleasures. This isn’t a hustling, bustling, high-rise metropolis, but a city of charming corners and cobbled streets, where you’ll get the warmest of welcomes. Despite its long history – which you can explore at museums, churches and more – it’s also a place with a youthful vibe, always at the cutting edge of Irish life. Join the crowd at a sing-a-long or eat your way around the city – either way, you’ll soon be planning your next vacation in Dublin.

You can pick up and drop off your rental car at various branches in Dublin, including at the nearby airport if you’re flying straight to the city. Have a look at our car collections and pick the vehicle that suits your needs – whether it’s a flying visit for a city break or a road trip to see the rest of Ireland. Pay in advance or on collection, and rest assured there are no hidden charges or credit card fees. Time to discover Dublin...

Pickup Locations Dublin

  • Dublin City Centre – Baggot Street Bridge

    Opening hours: (Seasonal Location)From 7 March until 6 November: Mo-Fr 0830-1730, Sa-Su 0900-1400 /// From 7 November until 6 March: Mo-Fr 0830-1730, Sa 0900-1300, Su Closed

    Address: 2 Haddington Road

    Phone: +353 1 6687566

  • Dublin Airport-Terminal 1 and 2

    Opening hours: Mo-Su 0500-0100.

    Address: Airport

    Phone: +353 1 8445466

  • Dublin City Centre-South Circular Road

    Opening hours: Mo-Fr 0830-1730, Sa 0900-1630, Su 0900-1530

    Address: 151-157 South Circular Road

    Phone: +353 1 7093060

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Driving in and around Dublin

A pretty street in the heart of Dublin

Dublin’s relatively small size means that it can sometimes be busy with traffic, and there are one-way systems in operation in much of the city. However, it’s a pleasant place to explore on four wheels, and your rental car gets you out to the suburbs, the stunning coastline of the east, and into Ireland on a whim.

In the city center, a 30kph speed limit was recently introduced, and is now being expanded out into the suburbs of Dublin. In other built-up areas of Ireland, the limit is 50kph, 100kph on national roads and 120kph on freeways. You’ll be driving on the left-hand side of the road throughout Ireland, overtaking on the right. Seatbelts are compulsory and it’s illegal to use a cell phone while driving.

To make a circuit of Dublin and avoid the city center, take the M50 Orbital road. There is a toll on the M50, and our staff can advise you on how best to pay for it – should you plan to use it – as there are no barriers or booths.

Dublin is well-connected to all parts of Ireland, with a number of roads fanning out in all directions. For the north, the M1 passes the airport and proceeds to Drogheda, Dundalk and the border with Northern Ireland. Drive south on the M11 and N11 for a coastal route that passes the gorgeous County Wicklow and eventually takes you to Wexford in the south-east.

If you wish to head inland or to the west, the M4 and M6 pass through Athlone en route to Galway, take the M7 and then the M9 to Waterford, or stay on the M7 for Limerick. Cork, Ireland’s second city, can be reached by leaving the M7 for the M8. Whichever way you head, you’ll find that Dublin is the perfect starting point for a whistle-stop tour of Ireland’s splendor.

A quick guide to Dublin

Nightlife at Temple Bar, a popular area for pubs, bars and restaurants

A city split isn’t necessarily a city divided, and while the River Liffey runs through the heart of Dublin, carving out its distinctive north and south, this is still a unified city with a sense of history, purpose and direction. You’ll find brilliant cafes from where you can look out at the world, water-side retreats, stunning libraries and marvelous museums, all within one of the world’s friendliest cities.

A glimpse of history

To see into Dublin’s past, the choices are seemingly limitless. The incredible Old Library with its treasure, The Book of Kells, within the 16th century Trinity College, is always popular – book a walking tour to see the very best of it. The Chester Beatty library at Dublin Castle also contains illuminated texts, Chinese jade books, ancient Qu’rans and biblical papyri in a collection that spans almost 5,000 years.

At the National Gallery you’ll see a fine array of Irish art, but also Caravaggio’s wondrous The Taking of Christ and pieces by Picasso, Rembrandt and El Greco. The Jack B Yeats collection here is also well worth a detour.

Haunted hostelries

The Irish love to tell tales to their visitors – and there’s no finer place than this city of myth to hear a ghost story. Many landlords will claim their pub is haunted, and there are also legends of the souls of former prisoners haunting Kilmainham Gaol – go see for yourself. Sheridan le Fanu wrote ghost stories in the city in the 19th century, and that heritage is celebrated at the Dublin Ghost Story Festival. If you’re feeling brave, head to Montpelier Hill, which is home to an 18th century building that once hosted The Hellfire Club. Rumors surround this occult club – ones of devil worship, sacrifices and visitors with cloven hooves.

Dine your way around Dublin

You’ll need plenty of energy to explore all of Dublin, so stay for dinner at one of the many fantastic eateries here. For consistently excellent dining, Chapter One, based below the Dublin Writers Museum, is a reliable choice. There’s a sophistication about the highly-rated Dax, where chef Graham Neville conjures magic from local ingredients. Try the Annagassan lobster, Clooconra cheese, Kildare beef or Ballycullane lamb for a true taste of the Irish larder.

For food on the go – combined with some sightseeing – there are a number of food markets, including one every week at Temple Bar. Street food is increasingly popular in the city – head for Eatyard in South Richmond Street from Thursday to Sunday for a rotating choice of vendors. Expect excellent Indian food from Kerala Kitchen, dirty burgers from Box Burger and pillowy Asian buns from Pow Bao. It might not be traditional Irish food, but this is an international city known for being open-minded and experimental when it comes to cuisine.

See the riches of this charismatic town with car rental in Dublin, and then leave the city behind to see the rest of the Emerald Isle – you won’t be able to wait to come here again.