Car Rental Ireland

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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen the booking is cancelled within two days of being made.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Car Rental Ireland – Hertz Rent a Car

The buzz of Dublin. The charm of Galway. The serene coastal towns. The rich green of the countryside. The friendly welcome of the locals. Ireland is a country of such allure, but the myths that swirl around this island nation, and transfix its visitors, are also part of its appeal. It’s the perfect country to explore by car rental, with rural drives of astonishing beauty, ancient routes and monuments waiting to be discovered.

With numerous pick-up locations across Ireland in destinations such as Dublin, Cork, Shannon, Kerry, Waterford and more, collect a car at a place that’s convenient for you and get out into the Celtic environs. With our best-price guarantee, no hidden charges or credit card fees and helpful staff who’ll set you on your way, you can be assured of a smooth arrival and departure. 

Driving in and around Ireland

The shops, bars and restaurants on the bank of the River Lee in Cork’s city center.

Driving around Ireland, you’ll be entranced by rural gorgeousness around every bend. It’s a truly tremendous place to explore by road, because outside of the major cities of Dublin and Cork – relatively small compared to the world’s metropolises – you’ll find Ireland a mostly rural place.

 If you’ve visited the UK, you’ll be familiar with most of the driving laws and customs. Roads are generally quiet and well-maintained, even in out-of-reach areas, and drivers polite. You’ll be driving on the left with the driver’s seat on the right-hand side of the car, and overtaking on the right. Unlike the UK, Ireland uses the metric system, so distances and speed limits are displayed in kilometers and kph.

Limits are 50kph in towns, 100kph on other roads and 120kph on freeways. Occasionally you’ll go through built-up residential areas, such as those near schools, which have lower limits. They’ll be clearly signposted. Dublin has introduced a limit of 30kph. Seat belts are compulsory, and there is a toll on the M50 Dublin that our staff can help you to organize payment for.

Take your pick of breath-taking drives through Ireland. There are coastal drives from Dublin north on the M1 to Drogheda and Dundalk, or south on the M50 and M11 to Wicklow and onto Wexford via the N11. Please note that if you cross the border to enter Northern Ireland, signs and distances change from kilometers to miles.

The M6 runs from Galway in the west, connecting with the M4 on to Dublin and the M7 from Dublin runs south-west to the stunning coastline at Limerick. If you’ve arrived at Cork, you can head north-east on the M8 to Dublin, or drive west on the N22 to Killarney National Park. From there, the rugged and romantic west coast opens up for you.

A quick guide to Ireland

Dark Hedges in Armoy, Northern Ireland.

The Emerald Isle didn’t get its nickname by accident – this is a place of lush green hills, oxbow lakes and atmospheric forests and woods. You can choose to stay away from the cities in favor of an entirely rural trip, but you’d be missing out, because Cork and Dublin are fascinating places to visit.

Dublin out of the dark ages

The cobbled streets glow with the light from many welcoming hostelries across Dublin, and this is just one part of the character and atmosphere that makes the city such a magnet for tourists. Dublin is where recent history is easily discovered and a long, long past is waiting to be uncovered. To begin that journey, visit the Old Library, which was built in the early 18th century. Walk around the long room – one of the finest libraries in the world – and check out The Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript pieced together painstakingly by monks, which dates back to the dark ages. As well as exploring Dublin’s engrossing, story-riddled city center, you should also make time for the National Museum and Trinity College.

An island within Ireland

Ireland’s second city, Cork, has a center built on an island surrounded by the serene River Lee. Even just strolling aimlessly around the city, watching the pretty buildings reflecting in the water, is a pleasure. However, if you do have a plan in mind, make sure it includes St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral. Architectural purists may scoff at its mixture of Gothic and other styles, but it’s undeniably unique – with a lavish interior, mosaics and a bishop’s throne. There are a couple of dozen festivals a year in Cork, including ones dedicated to film and jazz, so time your visit for one of those. Definitely check out the eclectic food scene – Electric is a modern classic that does tasty local seafood.

Of heather and hills

A long drive around the splendor of rural Ireland is both bracing and beautiful. The west coast is a place of crags and inlets, mist forming over hills, and quiet places perfect for contemplation. Head for Bantry Bay or the peninsula at Dingle – and if you do go to Dingle, check out Murphy’s handmade ice cream. You can get the most delicious flavors made with Kerry cow milk, including Caramelized Brown Bread, which is a thing of wonder.

South of Dublin you’ll find the Wicklow Mountains National Park. Park up and hike your way through the peaks strewn with heather, cross tiny streams to find tucked away waterfalls, or explore tranquil Glendalough – the Valley of the Two Lakes. There are plenty of organized tours you can join, and activities galore, but if you prefer the unscripted approach, simply dawdle through this outstanding area of natural beauty, keeping an eye out for Peregrine Falcons and rare types of orchid.

With ancient castles, great golf courses, the humbling Giant’s Causeway and so much more to see and do, car rental in Ireland is essential if you’re to make the very most of your visit to this special part of the world.