Car Rental Budapest – Hertz Rent a Car

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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen the booking is cancelled within two days of being made.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz in Budapest

Cut in half by the famed Danube River, Budapest is a city that it’s easy to fall head-over-heels in love with. Whether it’s a vacation or business that brings you here, it’s difficult not to be enchanted by the buildings, relaxed way of life – encapsulated in the many thermal baths and spas – and the abundance of great places to eat.

At night, when the city lights up, you’ll be struck by its splendor. The baroque and art nouveau edifices are illuminated from below, like a giant doll’s house for you to play in.

We have several pick-up locations dotted across the city for your convenience and a 24-hour helpline should you need assistance at any stage. Our team will be more than happy to answer any questions you have about driving in Budapest and wider Hungary.

Pickup Locations Budapest

  • Budapest Airport Terminal 2

    Opening hours: Mo-Su 0800-2400

    Address: Budapest Airport

    Phone: +36 1 2960996

  • Apaczai Csere Janos U

    Opening hours: Mo-Su 0700-1900

    Address: Apaczai Csere Janos utca 4,
    Danube Promenade

    Phone: +36 1 2960997

  • Budapest North-Pest Office

    Opening hours: Mo-Su 0700-1900

    Address: Vaci Ut 135-139

    Phone: +36 1 2960998

  • NXP Budapest

    Opening hours: Mo-Su 0700-1900

    Address: Apaczai Csere Janos,
    Apaczai Csere Janos U.4

    Phone: +36 266 4361

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Driving in and around Budapest

The stunning Hungarian Parliament Building looking over a river

Hungary is a great country to drive through, with many picturesque spots, lakes and pretty villages to discover. Budapest itself is easy to negotiate by car, although it’s worth noting that traffic in the city center, especially during the morning and evening rush hours, can be congested.

The speed limit in built-up areas of the city is 30mph, although you’ll come across zones and streets with lower limits. Parking in the center can be hard to find – the streets weren’t originally built for the levels of traffic they now have – so you’re best to park in an underground parking lot or use your hotel’s facilities.

Numerous bridges cross the Danube, while the Grand Boulevard – or Nagykorut – is one of the main routes through the center, connecting the Petofi and Margaret Bridges. Budapest isn’t just the capital, it’s also the country’s hub, and almost all of the main roads through Hungary start and end here.

For the outskirts, head east on the 4 (also called the E60), which then cuts across the country. The beautiful south-west of the country, particularly the areas bordering the vast Lake Balaton, can be reached in just a few hours on the E71. As a rule of thumb, the southern side of the lake has more of a youthful, party crowd, while the hilly northern side is more popular with those who want to hike, explore the woods or savor some true peace and quiet.

You can also follow the Danube on its route through the country, with the E60 tracing it west to the town of Gyor, and the E73 taking its course south to Szekszard. There are two main rules to remember if leaving Budapest – dipped headlights must be used during daytime, and you’ll need a sticker or ‘vignette’ on display in your rental car in order to use the toll roads. Our local team can advise you on this.

A quick guide to Budapest

Fishermans bastion castle and tower in the daytime

There’s enough to see in Budapest to lure you back time and time again. After all, this isn’t a place with a breakneck pace of life. Hungarians find time for a soak in the many steam and thermal baths you’ll find dotted around the city, and you’ll soon be tempted to join them.

City of Bridges 

Several bridges cross the Danube, but the Szechenyi Chain Bridge is the most celebrated of them all, linking the two towns of Buda and Pest. It was the first bridge to connect the towns, and the second to cross the Danube. No visit is complete without a stroll across the historic span, a bridge rebuilt after the German army demolished it during their retreat in 1945.

The top of the town

For the very best view of the city, head for the Fisherman’s Bastion. The towers here were built as lookouts during the 19th century – unsurprising in a city that has been invaded so many times over the centuries. The balconies are free to use, although there’s a small fee to pay to visit the top turrets. You’ll also find a small chapel and café up here, and from this great vantage point you can plot your route through the city.

Worshipping wonders

The various rulers of Budapest – from Christians to Ottomans – have always erected grand buildings as places of worship. Most Ottoman remnants have long since been scattered to the wind, with few memories of the time when, in the 16th century, Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent surveyed all he had conquered from Castle Hill.

The mosques and minarets have been torn down, but the tomb of Gul Baba, a dervish companion of Suleiman’s, can still be found on Mecset Street. Perhaps the greatest architectural legacy the Ottomans left are the numerous Turkish baths.

The main focus of Christian worship was St. Stephen’s Basilica, which has an intriguing if somewhat gloomy interior, while in the Jewish Quarter, the Great Synagogue is one of the world’s largest, built in 1859.

The best of Buda (and Pest)

Arrange a walking tour to make the most of a visit to Buda Castle (also known as the Royal Palace), a UNESCO World Heritage Site. There were fortifications here in the 13th century which the Ottomans allowed to decay before a 17th century siege destroyed it almost entirely. What you see now largely dates from the mid-18th century.

Get a glimpse into the city’s more recent history at the Liberty Monument – built in 1947 as a tribute to the Soviet liberators of Budapest. Of course, the Communist era was also to be a troubled one in Hungary and, like many Eastern European countries, they gleefully toppled their statues after the fall of the Iron Curtain. Many such statues are now gathered in Memento Park, a graveyard for Socialist realism sculpture.

Relax in the baths, hike up the hills for unsurpassed views and try to get a grip of the centuries of turmoil that have made this such as key city in European affairs. Car rental in Budapest is the best way to make the most of a visit to this fascinating city and to see the rest of what Hungary has in store.