Car Rental Germany

Starting from
$19 per day*
* Rates include tax and are based on a 7 day rental from 11/19/2018 - 11/26/2018 at Germany
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Why Hertz

  • Best price guarantee - in the unlikely event you find a lower Hertz price, we'll refund the difference
  • No cancellation or amendment feesWhen the booking is cancelled within two days of being made.
  • No hidden extras to pay - theft and damage cover included
  • No credit card fees

Hertz in Germany

A proud country with a rich history, Germany has always maintained a strong identity despite sharing borders with several other countries. It’s a place of modern, buzzing cities, enchanting forests, stunning scenery and plenty more besides.

If you’re looking for car rental in Germany, we have locations across the country, including all the major destinations such as Berlin, Frankfurt Airport and Munich. With no hidden extras to pay and no credit card fees, you'll quickly be on your way to exploring the best of this fascinating country.

Whether you’re here for a family vacation or a business trip, you’ll find the perfect car from our range. We'll aim to get you on the road as fast and as smoothly as possible, so you can make the most of every second of your time in Germany.

Driving in and around Germany

The city of Dresden next to the River Elbe

Germany is a fantastic country to drive around. Their freeways – known as autobahns – snake through the country to give you quick and easy access to the key cities.

Speed limits are set at 130km/h (around 80mph) on the autobahn and two-lane divided highways, 100km/h (62mph) on other major roads outside of towns and cities, and 50km/h (around 30mph) in built-up areas.

If you have any specific questions about driving in Germany, our staff will be delighted to help you.

With over 400,000 miles of road to drive in Germany, where do you start? The main autobahns are recognizable by their single digit numbers, while regional autobahns have double digits. They’re both toll-free.

Of the main autobahns, a rule of thumb is that even numbers go from east to west, odd numbers north to south.

You might expect the autobahns to be simply faceless freeways providing a quick route from A to B, and many are, but others wind through areas of outstanding natural beauty.

The A7 between Füssen and Wurzburg takes you past medieval castles and towns seemingly straight out of the past – hence its reputation as the ‘romantic road’. Other routes head through Alpine areas, skirting lakes and bold castles.

Head west for the Black Forest, another place peppered with scenic drives, while a rapid tour of the major cities is also easily achievable – a great way to see the unique differences between Dortmund and Dusseldorf, Munich and Mannheim. 

A quick guide to Germany

A panoramic view of a mountain village in the Black Forest

While Germany is renowned for its modern outlook, its success in industry and its importance in European politics, it’s also a place of immense history. After all, this is the nation that gave us Beethoven and Einstein, Handel and Karl Marx.

You’ll discover towns that are little changed for centuries, and others that are thoroughly contemporary. Germany offers the best of all worlds.

The best of Berlin 

Many of Germany’s cities deserve your attention, but let’s start with Berlin. It’s a hugely popular destination for tourists, artists, food fans and history buffs alike.

Visit the remains of the Berlin Wall and Checkpoint Charlie for a glimpse into the not-too-distant past, then explore both the east and west sides of the city to see the differences.

The Brandenburg Gate and the Reichstag have their stories to tell you too. Art is a big deal in Berlin, while it’s also become a hub for musicians.

Cologne is towards the western border and greets visitors with a display of Gothic splendor. The two towers of its cathedral immediately draw the eye, while the city itself is a lovely place to explore – friendly and welcoming.

Fairy tale Germany 

The forests and castles of Germany combine to make the place look like a fairy tale that has sprung to life. In Füssen, south-west of Munich and close to the border with Austria in Bavaria, you’ll find a host of wondrous castles.

The Hohes Schloss is a late-Gothic building in white, Hohenschwangau, the former home of King Ludwig II stands on the site of a 12th century castle, but Schloss Neuschwanstein trumps them all.

Ludwig II also designed this – both as a place to retire and an homage to old German knights. It’s a folly that’s simply breathtaking when coated in snow, but still a fascinating confection when it’s not.

Fantasy forests

If the castles have you got you in the mood for the romantic side of German history, look no further than the Black Forest in the south-west.

Just a short stroll will take you through landscape that shifts from eerie and shadowed to sun-dappled and rural. Rivers run through shaded valleys and past fields of cows, their bells tinkling around their necks.

Relax at the spa destination of Baden-Baden while you’re here, or take a leisurely drive through the pretty towns such as St. Blasien and Triberg.

Wurst all the way

Expect belt-busting stuff if you plan to eat your way around Germany – Schnitzel with mushroom sauce, the pizza-like Flammkuchen that’s a specialty of Alsace, and pretzels galore.

The ubiquitous currywurst – chopped pork sausage with a lightly-spiced sauce – is deeply tempting if you don’t want to go for the traditional wurst with sauerkraut, which you’ll find almost everywhere.

If you plan on fine dining, most of the big Michelin-starred restaurants are away from the cities. In the tiny Black forest town of Baiersbronn there are plenty of Michelin stars, with Restaurant Bareiss and Schwarzwaldstube holding a full complement of three apiece.

At the former, dine on cassolette of cushion of roe deer with chanterelles, while the latter offers sea bass cooked in a salt crust with oyster nage and caviar.

With so many great cities to explore, picture perfect countryside and those efficient autobahns to whisk you from A to B, car rental in Germany is a wonderful way to discover this always surprising country.