Aerial view from the outfield of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, filled with people during an evening game under the bright stadium lights in Boston, Massachusetts

Baseball’s Most Historic Stadium: A Guide to Fenway Park and Kenmore Square

Aerial view from the outfield of Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox, filled with people during an evening game under the bright stadium lights in Boston, Massachusetts

Baseball’s Most Historic Stadium: A Guide to Fenway Park and Kenmore Square

If you're visiting Kenmore Square, a stop at Fenway Park is a must—but it's not the only point of interest. The surrounding neighborhoods are worth exploring.

One of baseball’s most iconic destinations, Fenway Park, appeals to more than just fans of the sport. Home of the Boston Red Sox, the stadium has been in operation since 1912, making it one of the oldest and most renowned in the country. If you’re visiting Kenmore Square in Boston, a stop at this historic stadium is a must — but it’s not the only point of interest. The surrounding neighborhoods, Fenway-Kenmore and Back Bay, are rich with historic cultural attractions worth exploring. Add some of these top historical stops to your must-see Boston bucket list.

Fenway Park Tour

Close-up view of the Boston Red Sox ticket office windows, surrounded in green under a red light sign that says Tickets and another painted white sign for Will Call
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Boston is a city steeped in history, so it’s fitting that it’s home to the nation’s oldest Major League park still in use. Take a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at this historic baseball stadium on a one-hour tour. Each tour is different, but you might get to explore the Green Monster (the stadium’s towering left field wall), get up close with the famed Pesky’s Pole in right field, and see the Red Sox Hall of Fame wall with photos and mementos. Because of its historical significance and the knowledgeable tour guides, the stadium is worth touring, even if you aren’t a baseball fan.

Museum of Fine Arts

Follow your baseball tour with an art excursion at the Museum of Fine Arts. This Boston museum is one of the largest in the country, featuring more than 450,000 works. Founded in 1876, the museum moved to its current Huntington Avenue location in 1909.

The exhibits include art from around the world covering every period, from ancient Egyptian jewelry to contemporary paintings. The museum also boasts one of the largest collections of Monet paintings outside France. For an in-depth look at all the museum offers, take a guided tour, or sign up to participate in one of the rotating art classes.

Symphony Hall

Boston’s Symphony Hall is considered one of the world’s top concert halls. In operation since 1900, this Back Bay venue is a Boston landmark. The Boston Symphony Orchestra plays more than 250 shows a year, with themes ranging from favorite classical composers to contemporary performances. If you can’t make it to a show or want to learn more about this historic venue, behind-the-scenes tours are offered on Wednesdays and Saturdays from October to May.

Boston Public Library

Daytime, distant exterior view of the Central Library in the Back Bay neighborhood, part of the Boston Public Library, a stately stone building with rows of windows sitting on a green lawn
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As the country’s first free municipal library, the Boston Public Library is steeped in history. Its main branch, the Central Library, is a cornerstone of the Back Bay neighborhood, and it certainly impresses with grand architecture, both outside and inside. After browsing the books, take a free guided tour to learn more about the building’s background and architects, Charles Follen McKim and Philip Johnson. The tour also offers an opportunity to get an up-close look at the various artwork throughout the library.

Gibson House Museum

A view across the Charles River of the Boston skyline with Back Bay in the foreground on a bright, sunny day
Source: Adobe Stock

Finish your neighborhood history tour at Gibson House Museum, a well-preserved house hailing from the Victorian era. Walking through the doors of the museum is like stepping back in time. The home remains virtually untouched since its completion in 1860. See the Gibson family’s original furnishings and décor; explore the kitchen, scullery, and butler’s pantry; and get a glimpse of what life was like for this 19th century Boston family. Visits are by guided tour only Wednesday through Sunday.

Do you have your own favorite hangouts in the Fenway Park area? Share with us on our Facebook page.

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