A bright red camping tent is pictured on a hill with bright yellow, pink and purple flowers on it in Washington

Sleep Under the Stars: Best Places to Camp in Washington State

A bright red camping tent is pictured on a hill with bright yellow, pink and purple flowers on it in Washington

Sleep Under the Stars: Best Places to Camp in Washington State

Washington state offers some of the most breathtaking landscapes in the world. From Seattle to San Juan Islands, check out this list of the best places to camp.

The state of Washington is home to hundreds of campgrounds in state and national parks. Whether you like the comfort of your RV or trailer or prefer roughing it in a tent, the Evergreen State has some of the best places to camp in the U.S. for the nature lover.

Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park

A bright orange tent lights up the dark night sky in Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park in Washington.
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The Wanapum Recreation area on the Columbia River Gorge near Seattle is part of the Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park. The campground has 50 full hook-up sites, with a 60-foot maximum for RVs. It’s prone to high winds, so be sure to secure your tent. The campground is closed November 1 to February 28 each year.

Mount Rainier National

A lush green forest with tall, skinny evergreen trees are pictured in the foreground against an orange sky during sunrise with mountains in the background at Mount Rainier National Park in Washington.
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Mount Rainier is home to the popular Paradise and Sunrise Campgrounds, and it’s always crowded during the summer. For more privacy, try Ohanapecosh Campgrounds with 188 individual sites and two group campsites. It’s open from late May to early October. Some sites in various Mount Rainier campgrounds can be reserved, but others are first come, first served.

Gifford Pinchot National Forest

A fast running waterfall is pictured to the right with bright and lush green leaves and brush at Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Washington
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Gifford Pinchot National Forest has dozens of campgrounds in the Cowlitz Valley in the north and the Mount Adams area in the south. Camp at the tranquil Paradise Creek campground or Iron Creek Campground to explore the far side of Mount St Helen’s. Most campgrounds are open from the spring to early fall and accept reservations.

Alta Lake State Park

Large brown tree trunks are pictured against a green forest floor, with an orange tent in the middle in Alta Lake State Park in Washington.
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With 174 acres of camping, Alta Lake State Park offers two miles of hiking trails and 91 tent spaces. Take some time to walk through the Beebe Creek Wildlife Area to encounter deer, raccoons, eagles, and other wildlife. The campsite can accommodate trailers and RVs up to 38 feet. Camping season runs from April 1 to October 31 each year.

Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest

A large lake is pictured surrounded by trees covered in red, orange and green autumn leaves, with mountains in the background at Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Washington.
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East of Leavenworth in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, you can find Ida Creek Campgrounds. With 10 sites and accommodations for RVs up to 30 feet long, this small site doesn’t require reservations. Located where Ida and Icicle Roads intersect, the campgrounds have potable water and vault toilets.

Pearrygin Lake State Park

A parked RV is pictured with its outstretched awning sitting over two camping chairs at Pearrygin Lake State Park, Washington
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This 1,185-acre park is perfectly geared for camping. Pearrygin Lake State Park offers 75 standard sites and 50 full and 27 partial hook-up sites, with two primitive sites for really adventurous campers. Open only in the summer, it has Wi-Fi, firewood, and ice and is close to Tatie Peak and its 5.5 miles of hiking trails.

Cape Disappointment National Park

White waves crash against rocks at Cape Disappointment National Park in the U.S.
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Despite the name, Cape Disappointment National Park is one of the best places to camp in Washington State. This unique 1,882-acre camping park is close to the beach. Enjoy a concert at the amphitheater, and take in the view of North Head Lighthouse before sleeping under the stars. Rent a yurt or one of 137 standard or 60 full hook-up sites.

North Cascades National Park

Red socked feet are pictured sticking out of the opening of a tent, with a green field and mountains in the background as someone camps in North
Cascades National Park in the U.S.
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North Cascades National Park in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest provides mostly reservation-only car campsites, with most of the remaining campsites available on a first come, first served basis. There are 25 boat-in campsites in the Cascades back country and wilderness camping with access to 68 park trails and two national scenic trails.

Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

Snow caped Mt. Shuksan towers over lake in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington on a sunny day
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Mount Baker, a glaciated volcano in the North Cascade Mountains, offers a breathtaking backdrop for kayaking and other activities. The Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest offers dozens of campgrounds, from the secluded Red Bridge Campground to the Douglas Fir Campground near Mount Baker Highway. Most campsites open in April and close for the winter.

Wildwood Campground and RV Park

Multiple marshmellows on sticks sit over an open fire at Wildwood Campground and RV Park in the U.S.
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Washington state is known for its mix of federal and state park campgrounds, but it also has its share of independently owned and operated camping areas. Family-friendly Wildwood Campgrounds has clean showers, bathrooms, Wi-Fi, and all the comforts of home for new campers not used to “roughing it” in the wilderness.

Beacon Rock State Park

A large, calm lake extends into the horizon, with rocky hills to the left and a light blue sky in the background at Beacon Rock State Park, Washington.
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A year-round camping park in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Beacon Rock offers 9,500 feet of freshwater shoreline and the 848-foot high rock that gives the park its name. Set up a tent in one of the main campgrounds, or park a trailer in the equestrian campsite. Beacon Rock has 13 miles of bike and horse trails.

Spencer Spit State Park

A large, calm lake extends into the horizon, with rocky hills to the left and a light blue sky in the background at Beacon Rock State Park, Washington.
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Spencer Spit is one of the state parks in the San Juan Islands that is accessible by car. It offers a campsite with 37 large, private tent spaces along with two restrooms and a dump station, but no showers or hook-ups are available.

Do you have a favorite camping spot in Washington State or elsewhere in the U.S.? Let us know on our Facebook page.

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